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Unit 9 Assignment 1 Rogerian Argument Paper

As you may already know, an argumentative essay is a writing genre where the student establishes a position on a given or chosen topic and then uses evidence to persuade the audience to see things from his/her point of view. To write a great argumentative essay the students first have to investigate several sides of the argument, which allows them to make an educated stance. Then, they have to collect evidence, including facts, statistics, and claims from experts in the topic’s field. 

Generally, the primary objective of writing an argumentative essay is to learn how to convince people to change their mind about things which many of them are pretty firm about.

What Makes a Good Argumentative Essay Topic?

When you are asked to choose a good topic for your argument, start with something you are familiar with. Even if you hire a professional writer to help you with this assignment, speaking about something you know will be a much better sounding presentation of your arguments. Choosing an emotional topic is also a good idea. Appealing to the readers’ emotions connects them to the side of the writer and draws them in. One of the best ways to change anyone’s mind is with an emotional investment. 

Pick Your Own Topic or Get Your Essay Done For You

We offer a great list of topics for writing your own argumentative essay. Did you also know you can get your essay written for a small fee? We employ hundreds of professional writers, who specialize in essay, dissertation and research writing. They have written literally hundreds of academic papers for students worldwide. We know how to write a perfect custom-written argumentative essay that will meet your requirements and will get you the grade you want. Contact us now to get professional essay writing help!

If you would like to write the paper on your own, below is the actual list of argumentative essay topics along with sample essays on most discussed ones:

Middle/High School-Level Argumentative Essay Topics

College-Level Argumentative Essay Topics

Try to Avoid These Argument Topics  

Funny Argumentative Essay Topics

Classic Argumentative Essay Topics

Argument on Bioethics

Argument on Issues in the IT Sphere

Argumentative Topics for Legal Discussions

Argumentative Topics of Social Concerns

Ecological Issues

Society and the Media

Miscellaneous Topics

Now, once you have chosen a good topic from the list, try to lay down your thoughts on your screen. Here are some tips on how to do it right:

Tips on Writing a GREAT Argumentative Essay

Here is how your argumentative essay should be structured:

Adhering to the above structure of an argumentative essay will hold your creative process together:

  1. The first paragraph offers a brief review of the topic, explains its importance, and shares the essay’s clear and concise thesis statement.
  2. After the introduction come the body paragraphs, in which the writer develops his/her arguments and supports them with valid and reliable evidence.
  3. The support should be anecdotal, logical, statistical, or factual depending on the essay’s topic.
  4. Following the argument paragraphs, the writer shares the opposing views.
  5. Ending the paragraph is the conclusion. This paragraph is quite important since it leaves the reader with the most immediate impression. The writer should synthesize the information shared in the body of the essay as they restate the topic’s importance, review main points, as well as review the thesis. No new information should be shared in the conclusion.

Here is another cool tip to make your arguments sound stronger: use connection words!

How Do I Use Connection Words While Writing an Argumentative Essay?

Transition or connection words and phrases hold your essay together. They provide flow as they connect thoughts and ideas.

FunctionConnection Word
Additionadditionally; also; and; as a matter of fact; as well as; equally; equally important; furthermore; identically; in addition; in the first place; like; likewise; not only…but also; not to mention; similarly; together with; too
Contrastabove all; after all; albeit; although; although this may be true; as much as; be that it may; besides; but; conversely; despite; different from; even so/though; however; in contrast; in reality; in spite of; nevertheless; nonetheless; notwithstanding; of course…, but; on the contrary; on the other hand; or; otherwise; rather; regardless; whereas;
Cause or Purposeas; as/so long as; because of; due to; for fear that; for the purpose of; given that; granted (that); if…then; in case; in view of; in order to; in the event that; in the hope that; lest; only/even if; owing to; provided that; seeing/being that; since; so as to; so that; unless; when; whenever; while; with this in mind
Examples or Supportanother key point; as an illustration; by all means; chiefly; especially; for example; for instance; for this reason; in fact; in other words; notably; specifically; surprisingly; to point out; truly
Consequence or Resultaccordingly; as a result; because the; consequently; due to; for; for this reason; hence; in effect; in that case; since; so that; therefore; with the result that
Conclusion / Summary / Restatement

after all; all things considered; as a result; as can be seen; as shown above; consequently; for the most part; generally speaking; given these points; in conclusion; in fact; to summarize;

How Is Knowing All This Going to Help Me?

Writing a good argumentative essay develops your argumentative thinking. You will need it to not only survive among your peers today but also succeed among the humans around you in the future. Most of the businesses and partnerships prosper through argument. Getting the right arguments will help you prove your point and win.  

The modern world is ruled by the intellect. Those win who keep themselves focused on becoming stronger at what they are set to choose as the profession. It means no distraction on things of little importance.

That's right, in order to succeed, you need to stay focused on what you really feel and are willing to devote your life to. And it should really take up most of your time. Seriously. The more research you can do to get better at your future profession, the better.

We have been writing papers for students since 2005. You are welcome to use our essay writing service as one of the instruments of your career success strategy.

Here is a fun fact: Most of the geniuses out there are drop-outs. They were too focused on what really mattered to them and couldn't get their homework done on time. No matter if you run a successful business, get a busy job in a big corporation, need to visit your family or have an emergency - failing your module is a horrible possibility. That is why our writers are here to help you 24/7. If Mark Zuckerberg or Bill Gates knew about our service, we bet they could have gotten their degree on time by having the research handy.

AP Language & Composition Course Syllabus

“Take care that what you have gathered does not long remain in its original form inside of you: the bees would not be glorious if they did not convert what they found into something different and something better.” --Petrarch

COURSE DESCRIPTION: An AP course in English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects, as well as the way genre conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. (College Board)

LBHS CATALOG DESCRIPTION: This course will help students develop their writing skills and an awareness of style and rhetoric largely derived from a study of non-fiction literature. The students chief practice in composition will be writing of expository, analytical, and argumentative essays, and they will learn how to compose in a variety of modes and for a variety of purposes.  Vocabulary building as it relates to SAT, ACT, and AP testing is also studied. All students in the course will be expected to take the AP English Language and Composition exam in the spring. (LBHS Course Catalog)

Mrs. Stacey Wood

Lemon Bay High School, Room 334

(941) 474-7702 ext. 3353

stacey.wood@yourcharlotteshools.net

Course Objectives

  1. To increase awareness of word choice through word study and readings
  2. To develop reading comprehension skills through annotation practice and synthesized reflections
  3. To understand the process and application of rhetorical analysis
  4. To understand persuasive writing as both a genre and a writing form
  5. To build individual writing processes: ways for inventing, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing
  6. To develop a greater awareness of rhetoric in society
  7. To develop a voice as a writer, a citizen, and a scholar in preparation for the workforce and/or college coursework
  8. To build confidence in expressing opinions clearly, effectively, and in consideration of others

Course Theme: Cultural Connectivity

Course Keyword: Insight

Course Texts: Thank You for Arguing, Essential Rhetoric, Practical Argument, Sin and Syntax, Rhetorical Devices, and 75 Readings, 

Literary Texts: Faustus by Christopher Marlowe, Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, Winter of Discontent by John Steinbeck, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Harriet Ann Jacobs

Required Supplies: Composition book, highlighters (multiple colors), a flash drive, an Edmodo account

Quarter One: Course Overview, Rhetorical Awareness, Close Readings  (August 6 - October 9)

Quarter one opens with an overview of the components of the AP Language & Composition Exam, which students will take in May 2014. To fully prepare for the exam, the course syllabus will be discussed so that students may develop an awareness of the skill practice that will be presented throughout the school year. 

Unit 1: Thank You for Arguing and Summer Assignment

Thank You for Arguing: Students will openly discuss the assigned reading text, pointing out notable features of the text, the best points made by the author, what was learned, and how it was applied to the summer speech assignment. 

Summer Assignments: Students will deliver speeches to the class, as prepared over the summer, and will submit a hard copy to the teacher. The hard copy will be used as a writing diagnostic, allowing the student’s writing level and understanding of argumentation to be noted by the teacher. 

Multiple Choice Diagnostic (Practice): Students will be assessed on their level of understanding of AP Language & Composition vocabulary and reading comprehension skills needed to pass the multiple choice section of the AP Language & Composition exam.

Unit 2: Do the Benefits of Bottled Water Outweigh the Costs?

Key Terms: Aristotelian triangle, concession, connotation, context, counterargument, ethos, logos, occasion, pathos, persona, propaganda, purpose, refutation, rhetoric, rhetorical appeals, rhetorical triangle, SOAPS, speaker, subject, text, tone, formal argument, informal argument, either/or fallacy

Writing Skills Focus: Sentence structure, sentence variation, punctuation rules, subject/verb agreement, subject/pronoun agreement, appositives, thesis statement, claims, organization

Readings:
New York Times, “In Praise of Tap Water”
Zac Moore, “Defying the Nalgene”
Tom Standage, “Bad to the Last Drop
PolandSpring.com, “Poland Spring Water”
PureWater2Go.com, “Pure Water 2Go”
Susan Casey, “Our Oceans are Turning into Plastic ... Are We?”

In-class Essay: Synthesis Analysis Essay
500-1000 words
, the essay will work to include ethos, pathos, and logos, as well as the elements of the rhetorical triangle and/or SOAPStone. Students will use their assertion journals, as well as collected notes, to formulate their essay. 3 sources required. 

Unit 3: Do Violent Media Images Trigger Violent Behavior?

Key Terms: Aristotelian triangle, concession, connotation, context, counterargument, ethos, logos, occasion, pathos, persona, propaganda, purpose, refutation, rhetoric, rhetorical appeals, rhetorical triangle, SOAPS, speaker, subject, text, tone, formal argument, informal argument, either/or fallacy, bias, visual argument

Writing Skills Focus: Sentence structure, sentence variation, punctuation rules, subject/verb agreement, subject/pronoun agreement, appositives, thesis statement, claims, organization

Readings:
Gerard Jones, “Violent Media is Good for Kids”
John Leo, “When Life Imitates Video”
various letter to the editor excerpts 

In-class Essay: Individual Argument Essay
500-1000 words
, the essay will work to include ethos, pathos, and logos, as well as the elements of the rhetorical triangle and/or SOAPStone. Students will use their assertion journals, as well as collected notes, to formulate their essay. 

Unit 4: Is it Ethical to Buy Counterfeit Designer Merchandise?

Key Terms: Aristotelian triangle, concession, connotation, context, counterargument, ethos, logos, occasion, pathos, persona, propaganda, purpose, refutation, rhetoric, rhetorical appeals, rhetorical triangle, SOAPS, speaker, subject, text, tone, formal argument, informal argument, either/or fallacy, bias, visual argument, rhetorical strategies, simile, repetition, metaphor, allusion, parallelism, rhetorical question

Writing Skills Focus: Sentence structure, sentence variation, punctuation rules, subject/verb agreement, subject/pronoun agreement, appositives, thesis statement, claims, organization

Readings:
Dana Thomas, “Terror’s Purse Strings”
Rajeev Ravisankar, “Sweatshop Oppression”

Take-Home Essay: Rhetorical Analysis Essay
500-1000 words
, the essay will work to include ethos, pathos, and logos, as well as the elements of the rhetorical triangle and/or SOAPStone. Students will use their assertion journals, as well as collected notes, to formulate their essay.

Unit 5: Education

Key Terms: Aristotelian triangle, concession, connotation, context, counterargument, ethos, logos, occasion, pathos, persona, propaganda, purpose, refutation, rhetoric, rhetorical appeals, rhetorical triangle, SOAPS, speaker, subject, text, tone, formal argument, informal argument, either/or fallacy, bias, visual argument, rhetorical strategies, simile, repetition, metaphor, allusion, parallelism, rhetorical question, logic, deductive reasoning, premises, syllogism, major premise, minor premise, conclusion, validity, inductive reasoning, deductive reasoning, hasty generalization, logical fallacies, begging the question, circular reasoning, hasty generalization, weak analogy, ad hominem fallacy, equivocation, red herring, slippery-slope, Tu Quoque, appeal to doubtful authority, misuse of statistics, post hoc, non-sequitur, bandwagon appeal, Rogerian Argument, Toulmin Logic, warrant, qualifier, antithesis, straw man

Writing Skills Focus: Sentence structure, sentence variation, punctuation rules, subject/verb agreement, subject/pronoun agreement, appositives, thesis statement, claims, organization

Readings:
“I Know Why the Caged Bird Cannot Read: How American High School Students Learn to Loathe Literature” by Francine Prose
“Education” by Ralph Waldo Emerson
“A Talk to Teachers” by James Baldwin
“Superman and Me” by Sherman Alexie
“Best in Class” by Margaret Talbot
“Eleven” by Sandra Cisneros
“The Spirit of Education” by Norman Rockwell
“from Report of the Massachusetts Board of Education” by Horace Mann
“The Cosmic Prison” by Loren Eiseley in 75 Readings
“Coming to an Awareness of Language” by Malcolm X in 75 Readings

Take-Home Essay: Synthesis Analysis Essay
750-1000 words
, the essay will work to include ethos, pathos, and logos, as well as the elements of the rhetorical triangle and/or SOAPStone. Students will use their assertion journals, as well as collected notes, to formulate their essay. 3 sources required.

Quarter One Exam: The quarter one exam will consist of one in-class essay and a multiple choice test. Both portions of the test will be based on the AP Language & Composition Exam. 

Quarter Two: Rhetorical Analysis, Rhetorical Strategies, and Style    (October 14-December 20)

Quarter two shifts the course focus to the analysis of rhetorical devices and strategies used by writers. In preparation for both the AP Language & Composition Exam and the course mid-term examination, students will broaden their ability to explain how writers use rhetoric effectively through a focus on using rhetorical terminology.  Using terms in writing, discussion, and in annotations, student comprehension will be assessed through both the integration of terms in writing as well as through multiple choice practice like that found on the AP Language & Composition Exam. 

Unit 6: Community

The community unit includes several readings that focus on community as a construct of society, and our essay selection both encourages and denounces community practices in the United States. Here, students will work to develop their own ideas about community, what it means to be a community member, and the individual’s responsibility to the community. 

Key Terms: Aristotelian triangle, concession, connotation, context, counterargument, ethos, logos, occasion, pathos, persona, propaganda, purpose, refutation, rhetoric, rhetorical appeals, rhetorical triangle, SOAPS, speaker, subject, text, tone, formal argument, informal argument, either/or fallacy, bias, visual argument, rhetorical strategies, simile, repetition, metaphor, allusion, parallelism, rhetorical question, logic, deductive reasoning, premises, syllogism, major premise, minor premise, conclusion, validity, inductive reasoning, deductive reasoning, hasty generaliztion, logical fallicies, begging the question, circular reasoning, hasty generalization, weak analogy, ad hominem fallacy, equivocation, red herring, slippery-slope, Tu Quoque, appeal to doubtful authority, misuse of statistics, post hoc, nonsequitur, bandwagon appeal, Rogerian Argument, Toulmin Logic, warrant, qualifier, antithesis, straw man, alliteration, anaphora, antimetabole, antithesis, archaic diction, asyndeton, cumulative sentence, hortative sentence, imperative sentence, inversion, juxtaposition, metaphor, oxymoron, parallelism, periodic sentence, personification, rhetorical question, synecdoche, zeugma

Writing Skills Focus: Parallel structures, transition words, and transitional devices, active voice, inductive and deductive reasoning, cause and effect structure, definition structure

Readings: 

“Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King Jr.
“Where I have Lived, and What I Have Lived For” by Henry David Thoreau
“Walking the Path Between the Worlds” by Lori Arviso Alvord
“The Happy Life” by Bertrand Russell
“from Lifeboat Ethics” by Garrett Hardin
“The Singer Solution to World Poverty” by Peter Singer

In-class Essay: Synthesis Analysis Essay

Closing the unit on community, students will use their assertion journals to organize a paper that presents a clear position on the topic of community--one that is insightful and can be argued against. Students will also consider the opinions of others and recognize those that would argue by explaining countering opinions. 500-1000 words, this essay will include cited commentary (quote) and/or summaries of points (cited) derived from a minimum of 3 sources from the unit texts.

Unit 7: The Rhetoric of Faustus 

The Faustus unit will focus attention to the rhetorical devises found in major soliloquies and monologues. Here, students will work to deepen their understanding of the power of language and garner an appreciation for the depth of rhetoric in Elizabethan rhetoric. This unit, too, will draw heavily from Shakespeare in addition to Christopher Marlowe’s work. 

Key Terms: Key Terms: Aristotelian triangle, concession, connotation, context, counterargument, ethos, logos, occasion, pathos, persona, propaganda, purpose, refutation, rhetoric, rhetorical appeals, rhetorical triangle, SOAPS, speaker, subject, text, tone, formal argument, informal argument, either/or fallacy, bias, visual argument, rhetorical strategies, simile, repetition, metaphor, allusion, parallelism, rhetorical question, logic, deductive reasoning, premises, syllogism, major premise, minor premise, conclusion, validity, inductive reasoning, deductive reasoning, hasty generalization, logical fallacies, begging the question, circular reasoning, hasty generalization, weak analogy, ad hominem fallacy, equivocation, red herring, slippery-slope, Tu Quoque, appeal to doubtful authority, misuse of statistics, post hoc, non-sequitur, bandwagon appeal, Rogerian Argument, Toulmin Logic, warrant, qualifier, antithesis, straw man, alliteration, anaphora, antimetabole, antithesis, archaic diction, asyndeton, cumulative sentence, hortative sentence, imperative sentence, inversion, juxtaposition, metaphor, oxymoron, parallelism, periodic sentence, personification, rhetorical question, synecdoche, zeugma, soliloquy, monologue, aside, dialogue, iamb, prose

Writing Skills Focus: Parallel structures, transition words, and transitional devices, active voice, inductive and deductive reasoning, cause and effect structure, definition structure, evaluative argument

Faustus by Christopher Marlowe
De Copia by Desiderius Erasmus 

Take Home Essay: Rhetorical Analysis Essay
Closing the unit on Faustus, students will use their assertion journals and annotated copies of selections from Faustus to organize a paper that details the use of rhetoric in one soliloquy or monologue. 500-750 words, this essay will include cited commentary (quote) and/or summaries of points (cited) derived from a minimum of 3 sources from the unit texts, including the primary source (Faustus) and the secondary sources (criticism and De Copia). 

Midterm Examination: The midterm examination will mirror the AP Language & Composition Exam and will be composed of portions taken from previously released exams. 

Quarter Three: Understanding and Developing Argument                            (January 7-March 20)

Unit 8: Politics

Readings: 

“On Seeing England for the First Time” by Jamacia Kincaid
“On the Duty of Civil Disobedience” by Henry David Thoreau
“Thoughts on Peace in an Air Raid” by Virginia Woolf
“The Destruction of Culture” by Chris Hedges
“On the Rainy River” by Tim O’Brien
“Guernica” by Pablo Picaso
“Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell
“from The Empire Fights Back” by Chinua Achebe
“In Which the Ancient History I Learn is not My Own” by Eavan Boland
“Christiansted: Official Map and Guide” by National Park Service

Key Terms: additions TBA; review

Writing Skills Focus: ethical argument, analogy argument, proposal argument

In-class Essay: Individual Argument Essay
Take Home Essay: Synthesis Analysis Essay

Unit 9: Economy

Readings: 

“from Serving in Florida” by Barbara Ehrenreich
“A Modest Proposal” by Jonathan Swift
“The Atlantic Exposition Address” by Booker T. Washington
“The Great GAPsby” by Jeff Parker

Key Terms: Terms Review

Writing Skills Focus: Word economy, modifiers, analogy, arguments, ethical arguments

In-class Essay: Individual Argument Essay
Take Home Essay: Rhetorical Analysis or Synthesis Analysis Essay

Quarter Four: Language, Preparing for Exam Day, & the Individual                 (March 24-May 23)

Unit 10: Language

Readings: 

“Mother Tongue” by Amy Tan
“Politics and English Language” by George Orwell
“Always Living in Spanish” by Marjorie Agosin
“For Mohammed Zeid of Gaza, Age 15 and Why I Could Not Accept Your Invitation” by Naomi Shihab Nye
“Language Use in America” US Census Bureau
“How Much Wallop Can a Simple Word Pack?” Geoffrey Nunberg
“The War of Words: A Dispatch from the Front Lines” by Daniel Okrent
“Letters to the Editor in Response to ‘The War of the Words’”

Key Terms: Terms Review

Writing Skills Focus: Concision writing; cumulative, periodic, and inverted sentences; subordination in complex sentences

In-class Essay: Individual Argument Essay
In-class Essay: Synthesis Analysis
In-class Essay: Argument Essay

Unit 11: Preparing for Exam Day
During this unit, we will focus on exam preparation. We will review learning, peer review writing, and discuss strategies for exam day. We will also have a mock exam (TBA). 

Unit 12: The Individual in Society (Readings to begin just before exam.)
In this unit, we will focus attention on essay that explore individual perspectives of society. Readings TBA.

Course Final Exam: Writing Portfolio

Routine Assignment Information

Assertion Journal: Keeping an assertion journal helps writers organize ideas, arguments, and facts that can later be used in writing pieces. Students will keep an assertion journal while processing through the texts in this unit. In three parts, the journal will: 1) summarize each piece, creating an annotated bibliography for reference; 2) respond clearly to questions provided in the text, as assigned; and, 3) record individual collections of notes, thoughts, and ideas.

Word Journal: Building vocabulary is both individual and continuous. Therefore, while reading, students will take note of new and unfamiliar words, righting about each word in the back section of their composition books. For each essay assigned, students will collect 3 to 5 new words. Each new word should be, then, written about using these guidelines: What does the word appear to mean in the context used by the writer? What does the word appear to mean when divided into prefix, suffix, affix, and root? How do dictionaries define this word? How can you recycle this word, applying it to your own writing context?

Contextual Presentations: Students Will Chose One the Following Corresponding with our Readings.

Visual Exposition: Students will create a short visual presentation for the class that will explain the context of each writer: e.g. important historical events that occurred when the piece was written; important points about the writer’s biographical details. Each presentation will be no more than 5 minutes in length and will be presented to the class before reading the assigned article that corresponds with the presentation. Presentations should be visually appealing, succinct, clear, and expository in nature: personal opinions need not apply. 

Visual Persuasion: Students will locate and share one piece of visual rhetoric on the topic of politics that persuades audiences in some manner.  Each student will present their find to the class and explain how ethos, pathos, and logos function within the text. Examples of texts students can chose from include commercials, PSAs, print advertisements, vlogs (video blogs), billboards, college and university brochures and postcards.

Extra Credit Opportunities: On occasion, extra credit opportunities will be made available to students. These assignments will add up to 5 points to the regular assignment category. 

Course Expectations & Classroom Policy Guidelines

Classroom Policies: Below is an overview of our classroom policies. This is a guideline but is not exclusive. Individual situations will be individually consideration.

Plagiarism Policy: Definition (as noted in WPA’s Statement of Best Practices): “In an instructional setting, plagiarism occurs when a writer deliberately uses someone else’s language, ideas, or other original (not common-knowledge) material without acknowledging its source” (1).

Consequences for Plagiarism: All incidences of plagiarism will be treated equally by the course instructor. Students will receive a zero for the assignment where plagiarism has been detected, a parent or guardian will be notified of the situation, and a referral will be written so that the incident can be handled by administration.

Attendance: Attending class is necessary to develop the skills needed to fully prepare for the AP Language & Composition Exam, as well as to successfully complete this course. Whether your absence is excused or unexcused, it is each student’s responsibility to meet the course requirements, including deadlines. For example, if you are an absence on the day a paper is due does not extend the paper deadline, unless the absence is related to a verifiable emergency. If a student is absent due to illness, assignments should be turned in online through Edmodo or via emailing the instructor. 

Classroom Disruptions: Students who disrupt the learning of classmates lessen learning opportunities for all and, therefore, disruptions will not be tolerated. Disruptions include, but are not limited to, the use of cell phones, talking, passing notes, being off task, sleeping, etc. This is a college level course; therefore, you are expected to behave in an adult capacity. In a typical college classroom, students disrupting class are usually dismissed from class and asked not to return until the next session, regardless of the cost to the student’s grade and/or learning. Consequences in this classroom are as follows:

  1. The student will be warned.
  2. The student will be spoken to outside of class by the instructor.
  3. A parent or guardian will be notified of the negative classroom behavior.
  4. A referral will be written, notifying an administrator of the student’s need for further discussion and possible enforcement of consequences.

Edmodo: Edmodo is a class management system that allows our class to function in an online environment outside of class times. Each student is required to join the class so that materials and work can be completed via the internet in a controlled space, allowing students the opportunity to experience online learning environments before leaving high school.

Grading Information for Quarter 3:

In-Class Reading Response10%
Grammar & Vocabulary Practice10%
Take Home Essay20%
In-Class Essays20%
In-Class MC Practice Tests20%
Discussion Posts10%
Practice MC Tests10%
Total100%

Quarter Grade = 70%

Quarter Exam = 30%

General Grading Scale

AP Writing Rubric Scale

97-100     A+

9

9

9

9

93-96       A

8

8

8

8

90-92       A-

7

8

8

8

87-89       B+

6

7

7

7

83-86       B

5

6

7

7

80-82       B-

4

5

6

6

77-79       C+

3

4

5

6

73-76       C

2

3

4

5

70-72       C-

1

2

3

4

67-69       D+

1

2

3

63-66       D

1

2

60-62       D-

1

50-59       F

Quarter 1

Quarter 2

Quarter 3

Quarter 4

Dear Parents & Guardians,

Your student is currently enrolled in AP Language & Composition, a rigorous course that requires ample focus and attention outside of the classroom. Assigned work in AP courses is intended to mirror that of typical college courses. If your student has difficulty keeping up with coursework, please contact. I will do my best to provide you and your student with my best advice at managing life and schoolwork. 

 Also, please note that students will interact with texts that are intended to share the diverse opinions of society. Readings may include profanity and/or sexual insinuations and may focus on contemporary issues including, but not limited to, issues of sexuality, gender, race, class, religion, family situation, etc. Including texts that deal with controversial issues helps your student to prepare for the arguments that must be successfully composed on the AP Language & Composition Exam. However, if you are concerned about the readings, please feel free to call with questions. Additionally, titles are named in this syllabus and, while they are not exclusive to our course, the listings here are substantial and will provide you will the opportunity to preview texts chosen for this course. 

A Note on In-Class Reading Responses:

The writing prompt will be announced in class. If you are absent, it is your responsibility to make up this assignment. Makeup work will be granted within the guidelines of the student handbook and the course syllabus. Typically, you will have 3 days to complete the assignment. It must be completed in class.

For example: 

Absent January 13th

Return Tuesday, January 14th

Assignment due January 16th

After January 16th: Completion of the assignment will earn you no more than 50% of the regular grade. 

The syllabus page shows a table-oriented view of the course schedule, and the basics of course grading. You can add any other comments, notes, or thoughts you have about the course structure, course policies or anything else.

To add some comments, click the "Edit" link at the top.

Course Summary: