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Texas Tech Educational And Career Goals Essay For Graduate

Because your CV lists all of your educational and professional history, it is important that it is well organized and highlights your major academic and professional achievements.

All information on your CV must be accurate and up to date. By sending or posting your CV, you are agreeing that all information disclosed is accurate and true.

THE FOLLOWING SUGGESTIONS WILL HOPEFULLY ASSIST YOU IN PREPARING YOUR CV:

Unlike a resume, your CV should consist of as many pages as is necessary to include all of your educational and professional experiences. Your CV is your greatest tool to highlight your achievements and provide information about your research, presentations, teaching, service, and relevant work experience. Everyone needs a powerful CV to serve 2 main purposes:

  • To present a snapshot of you when not present
  • To help you get an interview.

Style. Each field has different styles of writing a CV. Because your field may have specific expectations of your CV, you should ask a professor in your field for more information about how CVs in your field are frequently presented. The goal is to show off your achievements and minimize any weaknesses.

Length. There are no limits to the length of your CV. A career center staff member will be happy to review your CV and help you in this process.

Identifying Information. Your name, address, phone number and e-mail address should be placed at the top of the page. If you have a school address and another address (parents, etc.), it is advisable to list those addresses where you might be reached. Be sure to update the address or phone number if changes occur.

Education + Dissertation or Thesis Topic. Included in this section are undergraduate and graduate degrees earned. Most recent degrees are listed first (reverse chronological order). Include your major and minor if applicable. Under your Dissertation or Thesis Topic, you should include your committee chair. You may promote your marketability by putting other areas of academic emphasis; i.e., "15 hours computer science," "8 hours technical writing," etc. If space allows, you might even list some course titles. Grade point averages may be given in this section. Some students give their cumulative GPA or choose major GPA or junior/senior GPA, depending on which represents them most favorably.

Research Interests/Research Profile. This section should include information about your current and prospective areas of research.

Research Experience. Should describe any research positions or experience.

Experience. This section may include part-time or full-time work. It may also include internships as well as volunteer experiences. Name, address of the organization, your title or position, and dates worked should be included. Describe your experiences in active, skill-related terms and emphasize accomplishments.

Areas of Teaching Experience. Consists of a summary of your teaching experiences.

Teaching Experience. Includes a more detailed list of the course and subjects you taught or co-taught as well as your position title and institution in which you gained this experience.

Honors and Awards. List awards in this section. May include academic achievements as well as scholarships.

Professional Memberships/Organizations. List any professional organizations for which you served on committees or held officer position.

Community/Administrative Service. List any community or administrative involvement in which you engaged.

Publications/Presentations This section may also be divided into two separate sections. It should include all professional publications and presentations written in the format required by your discipline (e.g., APA, MLA, Chicago).

References. Include each reference's name, title, address, phone number and e-mail address. Only list those persons who have given you permission to do so.

CV EXAMPLE

Additional Resources

Because your resume is perhaps the most important document in your job search efforts, there are some points to be considered in making this tool as effective as possible. Be prepared to invest the time required to polish and update your resume.

All information on your resume must be accurate and up to date. By sending or posting your resume, you are agreeing that all information disclosed is accurate and true.

THE FOLLOWING SUGGESTIONS WILL HOPEFULLY ASSIST YOU IN PREPARING YOUR RESUME:

Why have a resume?: Your resume is your greatest tool in acquiring an interview. Everyone needs a powerful resume to serve 2 main purposes:

  • To present a snapshot of your skills, abilities, experience, and knowledge.
  • To help you get an interview.

Style The three styles of resumes are chronological, functional and a combination of the two. The chronological resume lists jobs and duties sequentially beginning with the current or most recent position. This style focuses on your growth in a specific profession. The functional resume emphasizes professional skills. The combination of the two styles incorporates the strengths of both the chronological and the functional. Your resume should be short, easy to read, and use words that are familiar to the reader. The goal is to show off your achievements and minimize any weaknesses.

Length. You are encouraged to limit your resume to one page. Certainly, there are exceptions. A counselor will be happy to review your resume and help you in this process.

Identifying Information. There is no need to put the word "resume" or words "resume of" at the top of the page. This document has become recognizable and will speak for itself. Your name, phone number and e-mail address should be placed at the top of the page. If you choose to list your address and have a school address in addition to another address (parents, etc.), it is advisable to list those addresses where you might be reached. Be sure to update the address or phone number if changes occur.

Objective. Ideally, a resume will be specifically prepared for each employer. Because of this, use care in how you word your "career objective." If you are applying for positions in several different areas, the objective may be omitted from your resume. Education majors should replace "career objective" with "teaching field" because this is what they are certified for and it is not likely to change. To target a particular employer or career field, you may want to prepare individual resumes for the actual interview. Remember, cover letters can be used to serve the purpose of establishing why you are sending a resume and you will be the communicator of this information in the interview itself.

Education. Included in this section are undergraduate and graduate degrees earned. Most recent degrees are listed first (reverse chronological order). Include your major and minor if applicable. You may promote your marketable skills by putting other areas of academic emphasis; "15 hours computer science," "8 hours technical writing," etc. If space allows, you might even list some course titles. Grade point averages may be given in this section. Some students give their cumulative GPA or choose major GPA or junior/senior GPA, depending on which represents them most favorably. If you are not using the cumulative GPA, then label the GPA to explain it.

Experience. This section may include part-time or full-time work. It may also include internships and volunteer experiences. Name, city and state location of the organization, your title or position, and dates worked should be included. Describe your experiences in active, marketable skill-related terms and emphasize accomplishments.

OTHER CATEGORIES:

Extracurricular Activities. This section may be titled many different ways. What you want to emphasize is the name of the organization, leadership roles, accomplishments and dates. Involvement in activities can and should be presented in such a way to show that you can interact with others, motivate, problem-solve, and achieve goals.

Languages. State your foreign language skills and accurately indicate your fluency. Foreign studies and/or travel might be appropriately placed here.

Study Abroad. Study abroad can be listed in it's own section or in Education.

Skills. A skills summary can be a strong section to add, particularly for a generalist or for someone with varied work experience. Focus on objective marketable skills for the field you are targeting.

Computer Languages/Literacy. State your language knowledge and level of ability. For example: basic knowledge, conversational, or fluent.

Interests. The addition of a section on personal hobbies can provide the interviewer with helpful information. However, you should rarely delete other, more useful information to allow space for this section.

Personal. Personal data such as age, sex, weight, and place of birth were, at one time, a standard listing on the resume. Since the passing of equal employment legislation, this material is usually omitted. Unless you believe this is truly beneficial to the job you are seeking, this information is now considered to have little impact on hiring decisions and is generally omitted.Because relocation and willingness to travel are often a requirement for some career opportunities, University Career Center suggests that phrases such as "willing to travel," "willing to relocate" or "seek position in Southwest or Texas" be placed in the near the top of your resume, either in the job objective or in a profile section or in another section of the resume.

References. At some point during the hiring procedure you will be asked to furnish references. With few exceptions, your references will be contacted regarding your employability.

Though you may have written references in your application, we encourage you to list your references on a separate document. Include each reference's name, title, address, phone number and e-mail address. Only list those persons who have given you permission to do so. For those students who will be certified to teach, student teaching evaluations will automatically be included in your credentialing file at University Career Center.

RESUME EXAMPLES

Additional Resources

Cover Letter Tips


The letter of application, or cover letter, should accompany every resume you send to prospective employers. A good letter introduces you to the employer, briefly states the purpose of communication, highlights pertinent information from your resume, and suggests a meeting or interview. It should not reiterate everything in the resume, but should complement and expand upon the resume. A good cover letter will provide solid reasons as to why the applicant should be considered further. Remember that the main purpose of a cover letter is to get the reader interested enough in you to want to read your resume.

In the cover letter, remember to do the following

  • Type it neatly on 8 1/2" x 11" bond paper to match your resume. It should be kept clean and free of errors.
  • Keep it brief (no more than four paragraphs). Cut to the chase - don't ramble.
  • Never send a form letter. Each letter should be individually composed. Send an original letter and not a carbon copy; however, once a good letter has been developed, it may be used as a model many times with slight revisions.
  • When possible address your letter to a specific person, and with his/her appropriate title.
  • Talk about what you can do for them, and then take the initiative when closing by asking for an interview.
  • Use your own style of writing.
  • Use correct sentence structure and grammar.
  • Avoid excessive use of I, me, my by using introductory phrases so the personal pronoun is buried within the sentence. Example: "In addition to interning, I...
  • Keep a copy of all correspondence sent for your own records. You'll be amazed how helpful this can be when interviews and meetings arise.
  • When you complete a rough draft of your letter, show it to a career counselor, professor, experienced professional, or a friend for some helpful feedback.

Example

Video Resume

Thank You Letter Tips

Writing a Personal Statement

Helpful Knowledge

  • When applying to law schools, you will be asked to write one or more essays to submit with your application.
  • This is your opportunity to give the admissions committee a better understanding of who you truly are, and more importantly answer why you want to attend their Law School.
  • Take this essay seriously. Admissions committee's will read your statement when making their decisions.

Where do I begin?

The first step is to read the instructions provided for you by the law school to which you are applying.

The mission statement of the law school will provide good insight as to what the school emphasizes and encourages.

Law schools look for a concise, well-written personal essay that shows that you can write coherently.

Common themes found in Personal Statement's

These are common themes found in a large percentage of personal statement's. your personal statement is certainly not limited to these areas. These are only suggestions to give you an idea of what angle others have taken.

  • Academic tenacity and persistence
  • Intellectual curiosity
  • An understanding of and experience with the skills necessary for academic success in law school
  • Personal growth and maturity during your undergraduate education
  • Motivation to study law
  • Personal, academic, and social connection to our ever-diversifying community

What tips and suggestions can I follow before writing my Personal Statement?

  • Organize information around a theme that allows you to present your ideas clearly and logically.
  • Narrowing your appeal allows for easier transition, a concise point, and a confident personal statement.
  • Indicate what in your background suggests suitability for law school (if applicable).
  • Don't 'reach' for slightly relevant features or remind the school of its ranking.
  • Success in the face of adversity: You can use your personal statement to show the law school admissions committee that you are able to perform well academically under stress.
  • Remember that you are always answering the question, "Why do I want to go to law school?"
  • Leadership or employment: Remember that law school is an academic institution. The leadership experiences that you describe should relate to your education (e.g. co-curricular clubs) or from a professional experience (e.g. internships, significant employment, military service, national community service, etc...)
  • Bring out unique features of your undergraduate curriculum if they are not evident from your transcript or resume, such as independent readings, graduate level work, official undergraduate research, advanced writing, study abroad, etc.
  • If you have any blemishes in your record such as a low GPA or LAST score, consider writing an addendum explaining them. Do not offer excuses or blame others; instead, explain how/why your record appears this way. If the problem is recent, carefully indicate to the admissions committee why you would be a successful student.

Reviewing your Personal Statement

Your personal statement should be critiqued by more than one set of eyes.

  • Have a friend read your drafts for grammatical errors and consistency.
  • Have the Writing Center review your draft

Your personal statement should be able to concisely answer: How can Law School better equip you for your goals in life.

If you are having trouble finding your concrete answer as to why you want to go to law school try asking yourself why five times: this helps trim fat off of your answer to find the root of your inspiration for attending law school.