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Rhetorical Effectiveness Essay

Effectiveness of the Rhetorical Devices Used in the Manjeet Kripalani and Cindy Kimbbe Articles

1148 Words5 Pages

In this assignment there will be an analysis of the effectiveness of the rhetorical devices used in two of the articles in the assignment. First, I will address two of the rhetorical devices that were presented in “Ban Outsourcing? Bad Idea” by Manjeet Kripalani. Second, I will review the rhetorical devices that were presented in the article “Outsourcing: the good, the bad and the inevitable”, by Cindy Kibbe. The articles are both strong in opinion and detail with persuasive arguments; the analysis will review the validity, logic, accuracy, misleading statements, ambiguity, and credibility of each article.
Ban Outsourcing? Bad Idea by Manjeet Kripalani
Accomplished journalist, Manjeet Kripalani, in the article, “Ban Outsourcing? Bad…show more content…

In this assignment there will be an analysis of the effectiveness of the rhetorical devices used in two of the articles in the assignment. First, I will address two of the rhetorical devices that were presented in “Ban Outsourcing? Bad Idea” by Manjeet Kripalani. Second, I will review the rhetorical devices that were presented in the article “Outsourcing: the good, the bad and the inevitable”, by Cindy Kibbe. The articles are both strong in opinion and detail with persuasive arguments; the analysis will review the validity, logic, accuracy, misleading statements, ambiguity, and credibility of each article.
Ban Outsourcing? Bad Idea by Manjeet Kripalani
Accomplished journalist, Manjeet Kripalani, in the article, “Ban Outsourcing? Bad Idea”, describes positive impact of the United States (U.S.) outsourcing information technology positions to India and how this can benefit both the United States and India. Kripalani’s purpose is to provide readers a valid viewpoint of the positive impact on the economy in India. She generates a euphemistic approach on the communication to her readers that the United States politicians use this subject or their own gain.
In the first statement, Kripalani utilized the rhetorical device of emotional association, “But U.S. politicians better watch out they don't invoke a backlash, India-style” (Kripalani, 2004). The emotional association is brought to the reader’s attention as she is from India, so her emotional attachment to the country is

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The Rhetorical Analysis Essay

A rhetorical analysis essay addresses the effectiveness of an author's rhetoric (or writing strategy) for a particular writing.  When thinking about rhetoric, students should refer to the Rhetorical Triangle created by Aristotle, a Greek philosopher.  Colleges follow Aristotle's philosophy about rhetoric even today.
According to Aristotle, for an argument to be effective, an author should should take into account how the argument fits into the current society and time (kairos).   Also, an author should establish credibility with his audience (ethos); engage the audience's emotions (pathos); and use logical reasoning and evidence (logos).  
What is the first step?  Well, first the student should ask questions about the writing being evaluated.  The questions should cover the four considerations mentioned above.  Students should write down the answers to such questions so they can use these notes to develop their essay later.  Here are some question examples.

Kairos:
  1. What is the circumstance being addressed?  
  2. What event requires the need for the persuasion?
  3. What historical context requires the need for this writing?
  4. What kinds of beliefs or traditions would the author have to produce this writing?
  5. How do the figures of speech (allusions, word choice, historical or cultural references) reflect the time and location when and where the writing was done?
  6. Does the writing effectively fit the situation, time, and place?
Ethos:
  1. Who is the author?
  2. How does he or she establish credibility with the audience?
  3. Does the author appear well-informed and objective?
  4. Does the author's credibility allow him or her the authority to write about this topic?
  5. What is the author's purpose?  To argue, accuse, defend, praise, enlighten, persuade, teach?
Pathos:
  1. Who is the intended audience?
  2. How or does the author appeal to the audience's values?  What are they?
  3. Who is the incidental audience that may have read this work?
  4. Can you determine what the audience's response would be?
Logos:
  1. Can you summarize the main idea of the author?
  2. What are the main types of reasoning or arguments?
  3. Does the writer use certain "topics of invention" such as comparison, contrast, cause and effect, definition?
  4. Does the author appeal to the audience's emotion?
  5. How is the writing organized and does this organization fit the content?  
  6. How does the organization affect the purpose of the writing?
  7. What oral or literary genre is used--speech, letter, essay, poem?
  8. What are the figures of speech used--similes, metaphors, personification, literary allusions, alliteration, anaphora (repetition of clauses)?
  9. What is the author's style and tone--friendly, philosophical, sarcastic?
Second, develop a thesis.  After evaluating the writing with the questions above, a student needs to develop a position about the author's rhetorical strategy and express this position in a thesis.  Your thesis should be a strong claim that states how persuasive or unpersuasive your find the writer's argument for the intended audience.  Include the major strengths or weaknesses of the writing from the audience's viewpoint.  

Examples of strong rhetorical analysis theses:
  1. Although Jamieson includes several convincing logical arguments of ---- through the use of historical facts, the audience may doubt his objectivity because of his condescending tone.
  2. Martel effectively convinces his audience that ---- through the use of statistics and surveys complemented with short anecdotes that evoke the audience's empathy.
  3. Bulla uses personal anecdotes and extensive research of her subject to establish her credibility with the audience. These appeals to ethos, combined with her friendly tone, creates an effective argument for ----.
  4. Sanchez employs the rhetorical appeals of pathos and ethos effectively. However, his use of unsupported logical appeals causes his readers to doubt his assertion that ---- is supported by research. 
  5. Jackson’s attempt to convince the audience that ----- is unsuccessful because of his insensitive word choice and sarcastic tone.
Third, build an outline of your rhetorical analysis essay.  Student should always develop an outline for their essays to build a logical organization, reasonable connections between the parts of their essay, and meaningful content.  Here is an idea of how to organize a rhetorical analysis essay.  Use this type of outline to write the essay itself.
Sample Outline of a Rhetorical Analysis Essay

I. Introduction
A. Explain the cultural climate into which the argument was introduced.
B. Introduce author and essay.  Be sure to include the title of the work and a brief biography of the author.
C. Briefly explain the subject matter and main claim of the argument.  Describe the author's goals.
D. Identify the author's intended audience and any important second audiences.
E. State your thesis.

II. Ethos
A. Describe author's credibility.
B. Offer examples of how the author builds credibility within the writing.  Use quotes or paraphrase for this.  Analyze these examples for the audience of your essay.
C. Comment on how the writer's audience would respond to his or her credibility.  Note the author's strengths and weaknesses.

III. Pathos
A. Reveal the source of the original publication of the writing (publisher, website, organization)
B. Describe the author's intended audience by explaining how the author's work reveals who the audience is.  
C. Explain why the author chose this audience and how you are aware of this.
D. Discuss who might be excluded from the audience and why.
E. Discuss how the writer uses emotional appeals to connect with the audience.  Are they effective, inffective?

IV. Logos
A. Describe how the writing is organized so that your audience can gain a clear understanding of the writing even if they haven't read it.  How does the writing begin, progress, conclude?  Where are its major shifts in reasoning, content?
B. Identify the major claims and how they are supported with reasons, examples, evidence.  Identify any fallacious reasoning.
C. Discuss the quality of the writer's evidence and how it affects the audience.

V. Counterarguments or Qualifiers
A. Discuss where the author qualifies (limits) the claim.  What is the effect of the qualification on the audience?
B. Discuss how the author presents any counterarguments.  Does the author refute them with objectivity and convincing reasoning.  How does this affect the audience?

VI. Conclusion
A. Underscore the author's major strengths and weaknesses.
B. Provide a brief discussion of the importance of each strength and weakness.
C. Present a final evaluation of the author's overall effectiveness in persuading the intended audience.