Skip to content

For In Much Wisdom Is Much Grief Essay

  • Hnc Social Care
  • The Libation Bearers and Hamlet
  • “Columbine High School/Littleton, Co.” Analytical Essay
  • An Analysis of Countee Cullen's Any Human to Another
  • Dealing With and Conquering Grief in Banana Yoshimoto's Books, Kitchen and Midnight Shadows
  • Walt Whitman Research Paper
  • The Elegiac Quality of the Wanderer and the Seafarer
  • Baroque and Classical Wordpainting Techniques
  • Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
  • Divorce Research Paper
  • Lovely Bones Critical Analysis Paper
  • "The Raped Girl's Father"
  • Comparing Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper; and Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour
  • Honor as the Theme in Homer’s The Iliad
  • The Way Poets Present Ideas of Death and Loss in Mid-Term Break, On the Train, On My First Sonne and The Affliction of Margaret
  • Rhetorical Analysis for "Ways of Talking"
  • Darkness and Decay
  • Shakespeare’s Hamlet
  • Gloria Naylor's The Women of Brewster Place
  • bshs 405 week 3 individual paper
  • The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion
  • Comparing Robert Frost's Out Out and Seamus Heany's Mid Term Break
  • outline on Frankenstein
  • Mid Term Break by Seumas Heaney
  • Sassoon's Use of Irony in Glory of Women
  • The Advantages of Public Shame in the Scarlet Letter
  • Gilgamesh, Achilles and the Human Condition
  • Fate vs. Free Will (Oedipus Rex)
  • Chastity in The Rape of Lucrece and A Woman Killed with Kindness
  • Analysis of The Barn Burning by William Faulkner
  • Grief is Not Depression
  • Suffering and Surviving in James Baldwin's Sonny's Blues
  • Jealousy and Desire in Ovid's Metamorphoses
  • "The Raven" - a Critical Deconstruction
  • Factors that Contribute to the Issue of Divorce Among Christians
  • "A Rose for Emily": Insanity, Murder and Death
  • Barn Burning - Sartys Struggle
  • The Issue of Partial Birth Abortions
  • Compassion Fatigue in Pediatric Oncology Nurses
  • Effects of Losing a Job
  • Ethnography
  • Impact of Death on a Relationship Explored in Home Burial by Robert Frost
  • The Search for Destiny in The Epic of Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, and The Aeneid
  • Popular Music: The Creative Process
  • Abraham Lincoln: Civil War
  • Analysis of Home Burial
  • The Raven as the Demon as Despair
  • The Long Fall of One Eleven Heavy
  • Frozen River
  • The Genius of Hamlet, the Very Sane Prince of Denmark
  • Essay on the Selfish Mrs. Mallard in Kate Chopin's The Story of an Hour
  • A Withering Rose inWilliam Faulkner’s, A Rose For Emily
  • Symptoms and Treatments of Major Depressive Disorder
  • Dianna Assignment
  • My Last Duches by Robert Browning
  • Comparing The Story of an Hour, by Kate Chopin and The Yellow Wallpaper, by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
  • Accepting Fate and Inevitable Death in Banana Yoshimoto’s Kitchen and “Moonlight Shadow
  • Case analysis from ego psychology perspectives
  • The Mother by Gwendolyn Brooks
  • A Small, Good Thing, by Raymond Carver
  • Non-Profit Marketing Plan
  • Comparing Hamlet by William Shakespeare and The Killings by Andre Dubus
  • The Importance of Literary Elements in Barn Burning
  • Robert Frost Home Burial - The Three Tragedies of Home Burial
  • The Poems of the Harlem Renaissance
  • The Learning Process
  • Self-Expression in Theodore Roethke's Elegy for Jane
  • The Theme of Loneliness in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
  • A Case Related to Death, Dying and Bereavement
  • Report on We Were Soldiers
  • Bereavement in Teens
  • The Loss of a Life Partner
  • Write an essay about how Owen's poetry describes the plight of the
  • Essay Journey to Freedom
  • Banana Yoshimoto's Kitchen
  • The Lovely Bones, by Alice Sebold
  • Don Giovanni Opera in Modern Times
  • Parenting in Hamlet by William Shakespeare
  • Kate Chopin: the Story through Setting
  • The Story of an Hour
  • Mary Tyrone's Actual Happy Ending
  • Comparing Poe and Whittman
  • Ophelia's Road to Madness
  • This Way To The Gas versus On My First Son
  • Analysis of Home Burial by Robert Frost

EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(18) Grief.—Irritation.

Benson Commentary

Ecclesiastes 1:18. In much wisdom is much grief — Or displeasure to a man within himself, and against his present condition; and he that increaseth knowledge, increaseth sorrow — Which he does many ways, because he gets his knowledge with hard and wearisome labour, both of mind and body, with the consumption of his spirits, and shortening of his life; because he is often deceived with knowledge, falsely so called, and often mistakes error for truth, and is perplexed with manifold doubts, from which ignorant men are wholly free; because he hath the clearer prospect into, and quicker sense of, his own ignorance, and infirmities, and disorders; and, withal, how vain and ineffectual all his knowledge is for the prevention or removal of them; and because his knowledge is very imperfect and unsatisfying, yet increasing his thirst after more knowledge; lastly, because his knowledge quickly fades and dies with him, and then leaves him in no better, and possibly in a much worse condition, than that of the meanest and most unlearned man in the world.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary

1:12-18 Solomon tried all things, and found them vanity. He found his searches after knowledge weariness, not only to the flesh, but to the mind. The more he saw of the works done under the sun, the more he saw their vanity; and the sight often vexed his spirit. He could neither gain that satisfaction to himself, nor do that good to others, which he expected. Even the pursuit of knowledge and wisdom discovered man's wickedness and misery; so that the more he knew, the more he saw cause to lament and mourn. Let us learn to hate and fear sin, the cause of all this vanity and misery; to value Christ; to seek rest in the knowledge, love, and service of the Saviour.

Barnes' Notes on the Bible

We become more sensible of our ignorance and impotence, and therefore sorrowful, in proportion as we discover more of the constitution of nature and the scheme of Providence in the government of the world; every discovery serving to convince us that more remains concealed of which we had no suspicion before.

Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary

18. wisdom … knowledge—not in general, for wisdom, &c., are most excellent in their place; but speculative knowledge of man's ways (Ec 1:13, 17), which, the farther it goes, gives one the more pain to find how "crooked" and "wanting" they are (Ec 1:15; 12:12).

Matthew Poole's Commentary

Grief, or indignation, or displeasure within himself, and against his present condition.

Increaseth sorrow; which he doth many ways, partly, because he gets his knowledge with hard and wearisome labour, both of mind and body, with the consumption of his spirits, and shortening and embitterment of his life; partly, because he is oft deceived with knowledge falsely so called, and oft mistakes errors for truths, and is perplexed with manifold doubts, from which ignorant men are wholly free; partly, because he foresees, and consequently feels, the terror of many miseries which are or are likely to come to pass, which are unobserved by less knowing persons, and which possibly never happen; partly, because he hath the clearer prospect into, and quicker sense of, his own ignorance, and infirmities, and disorders, and withal how vain and ineffectual all his knowledge is for the prevention or removal of them; and partly, because his knowledge is very imperfect and unsatisfying, yet increasing his thirst after more knowledge, and consequently after more dissatisfaction, because instead of that just honour, and delight, and advantage which he expects from it, he meets with nothing but envy, and opposition, and contempt, because his knowledge quickly fades and dies with him, and then leaves him in no better, and possibly in a much worse, condition than the meanest and most unlearned man in the world.

Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible

For in much wisdom is much grief,.... In getting it, and losing it when it is gotten: or "indignation" (t), at himself and others; being more sensible of the follies and weakness of human nature;

and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow: for, the more he knows, the more he would know, and is more eager after it, and puts himself to more pains and trouble to acquire it; and hereby becomes more and more sensible of his own ignorance; and of the difficulty of attaining the knowledge he would come at; and of the insufficiency of it to make him easy and happy: and besides, the more knowledge he has, the more envy it draws upon him from others, who set themselves to oppose him, and detract from his character; in short, this is the sum of all human knowledge and wisdom, attained to in the highest degree; instead of making men comfortable and happy, it is found to be mere vanity, to cause vexation and disquietude of mind, and to promote grief and sorrow. There is indeed wisdom and knowledge opposite to this, and infinitely more excellent, and which, the more it is increased, the more joy and comfort it brings; and this is wisdom in the hidden part; a spiritual and experimental knowledge of Christ, and of God in Christ, and of divine and evangelical truths; but short of this knowledge there is no true peace, comfort, and happiness. The Targum is,

"for a man who multiplies wisdom, when he sins and does not turn by repentance, he multiplies indignation from the Lord; and he who increases knowledge, and dies in his youth, increases grief of heart to those who are near akin to him.''

(t) "multa ira", Pagninus, Montanus; "indignatio", V. L. Tigurine version, Vatablus, Drusius; "multum indignationis", Junius & Tremellius, Piscator.

Geneva Study Bible

For in much wisdom is much {m} grief: and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow.

(m) Wisdom and knowledge cannot be come by without great pain of body and mind: for when a man has attained the highest, yet is his mind never fully content: therefore in this world is no true happiness.