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Animal Farm Essays Questions

Essay Topic 1

Describe in detail what parallels can be drawn in this book between the animals' struggles and that of the Russian Revolution. Be specific and include at least five parallels.

Essay Topic 2

Throughout the novel, the author uses clear, simple, and accessible language to construct the novel. Explain how this writing technique is useful for conveying the complex issues discussed throughout the novel. Include specific examples from the text to support your explanation.

Essay Topic 3

Write an essay comparing the characters of Napoleon and Snowball. Include at least five similarities and differences between these characters.

Essay Topic 4

Write an essay explaining how you think things might have been different on the farm had Snowball not been driven off by the Napoleon and the dogs. Use specific events from the story and show how they might have been different had Snowball been in charge at that time.

Essay Topic 5

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Main Characters

 Napoleon

Napoleon is one of the two pigs who profess to carry on Old Major’s dream. When Napoleon’s dogs drive Snowball off the farm, Napoleon becomes the new “ruler" and proceeds to break every rule of Animalism.

Napoleon, named after a non-Communist dictator, is obviously looking out only for himself. He even sells his most loyal worker, Boxer, to the glue maker, in order to get more money for himself. Like most dictators, he focuses on the young, represented by the pack of dogs Napoleon raises into vicious beasts, ready to harm or kill anyone who speaks out against him. He takes others’ ideas and claims them as his own, which is why he has to rearrange history in order to claim that the windmill was his idea, not Snowball’s.

Snowball

Snowball, in contrast to Napoleon, has some strong and logical ideas. He sticks to the principles of Animalism, other than the fact that he also agrees in the superiority of the pigs. Nevertheless, he teaches the rest of the animals to read, develops the idea of the windmill to make the farm more self sufficient, and avoids violence. Although Orwell depicts Snowball in a more positive light than Napoleon, Snowball obviously looks down on the other animals and is attempting to gain more power than Napoleon throughout most of the book.

Boxer

Boxer, the loyal workhorse, is the most sympathetic character in Animal Farm. He follows whatever his superiors say, replacing his early motto of “I will work harder" with “Napoleon is always right." He does anything in his power to help Animal Farm.

Although Orwell portrays him as intellectually slow, his physical power and extreme dedication make up for his lack of mental ability. As a symbol of the working class, Boxer eventually meets his downfall when Napoleon sells him to a glue maker, which shows how the loyalty of the working class is only matched by the leadership’s betrayal of that loyalty.